Senior Care

Living Well Assisted Living at Home

Belvedere Tiburon, CA

Gold member

Licensed in CA – Validate
Psychologist – 19255

About Living Well Assisted Living at Home

Living Well offers specialized care for adults with chronic and debilitating conditions like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS, which compromise their ability to live safely in their homes, where they want to be.

As the needs of this population grow more complex, especially when there is loss of memory or mobility, you search for meaningful and manageable solutions. As you understand the value of staying at home, the power of autonomy and the importance of community to longevity and health, you seek a new model for elder care.

At Living Well, we are forging this new model.

We are now serving San Francisco and the Greater Bay Area.

Location

Belvedere Tiburon, CA 94920

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Reviews

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  • 1/5 stars January 30, 2013

    The review above by Zel is done by Doris's wife. I reached out to Doris and found her to be abrasive on the phone and couldn't believe how much they charged. They were very pushy and didn't make me feel comfortable doing business with them. Steer clear. The reason why I know Zel is Doris's partner is I couldn't believe someone would give them 5 stars and I did a google search and saw the two mentioned together and living Sausalito. Stay away. Very very very far away.

    Doris B. from Living Well Assisted Living at Home replied to this review on January 30, 2013:

    Dear Phyliss:

    Thank you for your feedback. It is not my intention to be abrasive on the phone and obviously, I can be so. Therefore your feed-back is very helpful. I am very sorry for not meeting your needs when necessary.

    As per my mother in-law's care, it was a very legitimate case of a diligent and 5 star one, as other recipients can testify of. Nothing to hide about it. As I said, I wish I could have met your needs.

    Dr. Doris Bersing, PhD
    Living Well -President and CEO

  • 5/5 stars November 24, 2012

    I engaged Dr. Bersing's Living Well services to help with my mom's discharge from the hospital after a surgery that left her weak for some months. Envisioning care for mom at home was daunting. We all have very demanding careers and mom is quite independent and didn't want help. Living Well had the staff with enough knowledge, acumen and compassion to overcome mom's resistence to assistance and also helped her keep her dignity during this time of needed assistance. The transition and services not only were comprehensive but seamless.Living Well is an excellent organization!

Question and answer

Q. What advice do you have for a customer looking to hire a provider like you?

A. Home care services: Questions to ask
Home care services range from medical care to help with daily household chores. If you're considering home care services, ask these questions to choose the best provider for your needs.

By Mayo Clinic staff
If you're recovering from surgery or need long term care for a chronic illness or you have a loved one facing a similar situation you may be interested in home care services. Home care services range from skilled care provided by nurses or therapists to household support, such as cleaning, cooking and running errands.
Whether you're planning to enlist the help of a home care services agency or hire a personal home health aide, knowing what questions to ask can help ensure that you receive quality assistance.
Qualifications
If you're considering a home care services agency:
Is the agency licensed by the state? Most states but not all require agencies to be licensed and reviewed regularly. Reviews may be available on request through your state health department.
Is the agency certified by Medicare to meet federal requirements for health and safety? If not, ask why.
What type of employee screening is done? Can the agency provide references? Ask for a list of doctors, hospital discharge planners or other professionals who have experience with the agency, as well as a list of former clients. Ask doctors, family and friends for agency recommendations.
Is the agency accredited by a governing agency such as The Joint Commission, an independent group that evaluates and accredits health care organizations and programs that voluntarily request review? If so, ask to see the results of the most recent survey.
If you're considering a home health aide:
What are the aide's credentials? Make sure you're comfortable with the aide's training and experience.
Can the aide provide references? Take time to check the aide's references thoroughly. Ask doctors, family and friends for home health aide recommendations.
Quality of care
If you're considering a home care services agency:
How does the agency hire and train caregivers? Does the agency provide continuing education?
Are the caregivers licensed and insured?
How closely does the agency's supervisor evaluate the quality of home care?
Does the agency have a quality improvement program?
Do the agency's employees seem friendly and helpful? Make sure you feel comfortable with the agency's representatives.
If you're considering a home health aide:
Does the home health aide have a positive attitude?
Are you and your loved one comfortable with the home health aide?
Costs
If you're considering a home care services agency:
How does the agency handle expenses and billing? Ask for literature explaining all services and fees, as well as detailed explanations of all the costs associated with home care.
Will agency fees be covered by health insurance or Medicare? Find out what arrangements are in place for specific health insurance plans.
What resources does the agency provide for financial assistance, if needed? For instance, is a payment plan available?
If you're considering a home health aide:
How much does the aide charge for home health services? Make sure you're comfortable with the fees and the included services.
Does the aide require payment for sick days, vacation days or holidays? If so, clarify how many sick and vacation days are allowed, as well as which days are considered holidays.
Understanding services
Whether you're considering a home care services agency or a home health aide, you might ask these questions about services:
Will you receive a written care plan before service begins? The care plan should include details about medical equipment and specific care needs, contain input from your or your loved one's doctor, and be updated frequently.
Will you receive a list of the rights and responsibilities of all parties involved? This is sometimes known as a patient's bill of rights.
Will you or your loved one be referred to dietitians, counselors, therapists or other specialists, if needed?
Will the agency work directly with you or your loved one, family members and health care providers?
Must you identify a primary family caregiver? If so, what's required of that person?
Are there any limits on the types of tasks performed? If so, what are the limits?
When will service be provided? Is care available round-the-clock, if necessary?
What procedures are in place for emergencies? Ask how the agency or home health aide will deliver services in the event of a power failure or natural disaster.
How are problems addressed and resolved? Whom can you or another family member contact with requests, questions or complaints?
When can services begin?
Monitor your home care services
After you've found a home care services provider, monitor the situation. If you're concerned about the care or services provided, discuss it promptly with the agency or home health aide. If necessary, involve your doctor or your loved one's doctor as well.

Q. If you were a customer, what do you wish you knew about your trade? Any inside secrets to share?

A. How workers are match to customers- personality clashes are very frequent.

How the company handle medical emergencies?

Make sure that the agency not only "care" for the activities of daily living but also engage your loved one in a smart way.

Will the company grow with the client as his/hers needs progress and change?

Is the staff trained to handle difficult behaviors or mental illness in the elderly?

Q. What important information should buyers have thought through before seeking you out?

A. Personal needs, likes and dislikes of the loved one for whom they are looking for help.

Financial and Legal information in terms of decision makers.

Consensus among family members in regards to the need for services.

Q. Why does your work stand out from others who do what you do?

A. Aging in place (in your home) is a new paradigm on long term care but there are not facilities or models that accommodate "difficult" illnesses or personalities.

At Living Well, we are forging this new model.

Living Well offers specialized care for adults with chronic and debilitating conditions like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and ALS that compromise their ability to live safely in their homes, where they want to be.

As the needs of this population grow more complex especially when there is loss of memory or mobility you search for meaningful and manageable solutions. And as you understand the value of staying at home, the power of autonomy and the importance of community to longevity and health you seek a new model for elder care.

Q. What do you like most about your job?

A. I love providing alternatives to family members to care for their loved ones to those that would otherwise not be able to do so. The smile on their faces is overwhelming and makes me feel I have done my job right. I have always enjoyed helping people so I know I am doing the right thing.

Giving elders a choice to age in place and providing peace of mind to family members.

Q. Do you have a favorite story from your work?

A. Taking care of a person with mid dementia who wanted just to go back to his daily routine (he was a bus driver and was discharged before closing his final route due to an accident).
We were able to work with the municipal transportation agency and allow the client (accompanied by one of our dementia companions) to ride the line he used to drive, getting in and out in different shift change stations and help the person to complete this unfinished business.

Q. Tell us about a recent job you did that you are particularly proud of.

A. We had a request from a family member to help one of their parents who needed medical help but refuse the help.
We met with the parent and realize he was very proud of still be working, so we accommodate to find a nurse with bookkeeping experience and placed the person to work at the office as a bookkeeper until gaining the client's confidence and help introduce help as needed gradually.

Q. What is your greatest strength?

A. Being able to design smart interventions to the most complicated behavioral issues and family dynamics that usually arise in eldercare.

And the use of cutting-edge gero-technology and excellent customer service and compassionate well trained direct care staff.