Drake Dietrick HD Video

5.0
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(11)
5.0
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11 reviews
5
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Customers rated this pro highly for responsiveness, value, and work quality.
  • Daniel P.

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    Drake is awesome. Very professional, responsive. We couldn’t be happier with his service. I would highly recommend using him.

    Oct 4, 2017Verified
  • Myra O.

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    Drake is amazing at what he does. He's seamless and you get the video right after the event. It's truly a work of art. Thank you Drake!!!

    Sep 6, 2017Verified

About this pro

Videographer in High Definition. No deposit required. Ceremony & Reception $85 per hour. Complete edited Blue Ray or DVD sets in Wide Screen format sent out FAST. Located in the Chicago area. I love being able to make my customers happy with a life long memory on film. I love being creative and solving problems.

Years in business

11

Times hired on Thumbtack

25

Number of employees

1
Show more

Photos and Videos

15 photos and 1 video

    Q & A

    • What should the customer know about your pricing (e.g., discounts, fees)?
      Let's talk about wedding costs. You spend thousands of dollars on a limosine, venue, dress, shoes, hair stylist, tuxedo rentals, flowers, food, DJ or band and perhaps even an extravagent honeymoon…but just can’t justify paying for a good videographer. Let me ask you, how long after your wedding will you remember the food, what the band played, or the limo that drove you to the church? Now tell me, for how many years will you keep looking at your wedding videos? If the answer is “for the rest of my life”, then you might want to prioritize the videographer you choose. But why are they so damn expensive? You still ask. I’ll give you an analogy: You and your fiance go to a restaurant to have an appetizer, burger and fries, washed down with a Diet Coke®. You order it from the waiter, it’s cooked and brought to you, you eat it, pay $19.95 + 20% tip and go on your merry way. If you had prepared your meal at home the ingredients would’ve cost you a total of $10.00-$15.00 at the most. What a ripoff! The restaurant owes you for the food and the tip! But does it? Let’s go over the individual items that add up to the cost of your meal: The raw food products Rent for the restaurant space Utilities (electricity, gas, phone) Cleaning supplies Furniture and decoration Waiting staff Kitchen staff Cleaning staff Management staff Host staff Plates, cutlery, cooking utensils, glasses, menus, etc Taxes on earnings Publicity for restaurant Insurance Liquor License Business License Looking at this list it’s clear why the actual food is only a small part of the total cost of your meal. What happens if this restaurant delivers and you order food from your house? You still pay about the same price! (Maybe a little less if you tip the delivery guy less than you tipped the waiter.) And it’s not like the restaurant owner is going to take your $19.95 + 20% tip and pocket the whole sum, no, they’re going to make a small, small profit on your meal and hope that enough people eat at the restaurant every day that in the end they come out on top. A videography business isn’t so different from a restaurant, except with wedding videography you are always ordering delivery, unless you happen to get married in a videography studio. Videographer costs are different from a restaurant business...but here are a few: Videography equipment camera #1 cost me $1,200.00 my backup HD camera #2 with card and all accessories cost $650.00. (Accessories include: LED lights were $65.00 each, special wide screen lenses, cables, bags and carrying cases, an extension arm, optimized/extended time batteries and back up camera #3 was $350.00) Computer equipment laptop with card reader (CPU, external hard drives, high-quality screen, flash memory cards 64 Gig card can cost up to $180.00) Equipment maintenance, repair and replacement Equipment insurance Liability insurance Health insurance Transportation gas is $4.00 per gallon right now. Pre-wedding consultations Website hosting Advertising Taxes on earnings Video Editing Software (both imaging and accounting) Storage for high definition video files (with backups) Time spent maintaining website/blog and filling it with content Time spent in consultations and on the phone with bride & groom Time spent shooting wedding Time spent editing the hours of footage at each wedding Time spent creating wedding highlight reels and other similar custom requests Printing costs for paper and toner for DVD labels, DVD covers. Shipping costs for final deliverable DVD or Blue Ray set. After factoring in all these costs there has to be enough money left over for the videographer to make a profit and a living. Some of these costs (equipment, insurance, etc) are spread out over all the weddings shot each season, but others are for each single wedding, editing time, time spent meeting with bride and groom, etc. When you take all these costs into account, does charging $90.00 per hour for wedding videography sound like a lot? I am a wedding videographer, so I looked at what the Craigslist wedding videographers were charging and decided I would start by charging towards the lower end of their fees because I wanted to get established, but after a few years of looking at their work I finally felt that I could do better...and give a superior effort. If you pay a student or the lower end of the spectrum for your wedding videography chances are it won’t be much better than what your uncle or nephew could do, while that $2,000 videographer has several years of experience, a clear style, and will deliver beautiful videos no matter what you throw at them (dark churches, dark reception halls, rainy day, paintball reception…).
    • What is your typical process for working with a new customer?
      We arrive at expectations.
    • What education and/or training do you have that relates to your work?
      I plan on taking additional classes even though I have 300 hours of under graduate work under my belt. Eventually...I am going to write and direct, so perhaps my videography DVD's or Blue Rays can become collector's items. Just kidding. In my pipe dream world, anyway.
    Coverage Area for Drake Dietrick HD Video is about 35+ miles of Park Ridge, IL.