Find an aerobics instructor near Summit, NJ

100+ near you

Find an aerobics instructor near Summit, NJ

100+ near you

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Top 10 Aerobics Instructors near Summit, NJ

5.0
from 7 reviews
5.0
(7)
  • 4 years in business
  • 13 hires on Thumbtack
"I've trained with countless personal trainers out in NJ, VA, and here in NYC from private gyms (90 Second fitness) to public gyms ( Equinox, NYSC, LA fitness, Balleys, Mid City, MPHC, and Synergy) specifically for sprinting, fat loss, proper technique, and for other miscellaneous goals so I feel confident in my following assessment of Emmanuel George (a.k.a. Manny). I've attended approximately 10 private training lessons with Manny so far and found his style both enjoyable in terms of keeping the mood upbeat and feeling positive, while still providing a supremely intense work out along with solid technical and engaging feedback that would improve my workout and performance. I'm a stickler for proper posture and technique so I found it refreshing to see that Manny knew his stuff. I also appreciate the fact that he is extremely punctual, flexible, and accommodating with his scheduling. Manny has trained me at my gym, at his private gym, and even Central Park. And so far, he has arrived on time, with an infecting cheerful spirit, and prepared with all the equipment and with a mapped out workout plan already in mind. I really dislike it when other trainers just 'wing it' on the spot; fortunately for me, Manny shows much more initiative than that. Manny is one of the most patient, well-trained, highly skilled, reliable, and experienced personal trainers in the NYC Area. Not only does he offer extremely competitive rates and packages, but he is also extremely knowledgeable with mixed martial arts, free weights, and calisthenics. My initial goal when first starting with Manny was to just get back on a regular workout routine. However, I've already noticed substantial muscle gain, toner body, fat loss, and a much stronger core. Whatever Manny's workouts are doing for my body, it's definately working. As aforementioned, I've taken privates and group classes elsewhere, but they pale in comparison to Manny. He carries a commendable etiquette and professional and a great personality; he doesn't rush or blaze through the techniques and session with frustration and ignorance as others have with me. He even offers to take your body fat and mass stats and a diet plan. So all in all, I highly recommend seeing Manny whether you are an absolute beginner new to working out or an avid athlete with targeted goals. Keep up the good work Emmanuel! Best, SC."
$75
estimated cost

Q & A

Answers to commonly asked questions from the experts on Thumbtack.

Why is physical therapy important?

Physical therapy can help you recover range of motion and ease pain after injury, accident or illness. Many people are prescribed physical therapy by their primary care doctor or specialist after a car accident, surgery or sports-related injury. You don’t need a doctor’s referral to start physical therapy, but unless you are paying out of pocket for the services, your insurance provider might require a referral. Physical therapy is also a medical solution for pain associated with chronic illness such as osteoarthritis and can be used for recovery after a stroke or other neurological disorders.

Physical therapy teaches you how to move your body in a safe and healing way to regain strength and movement. During a physical therapy session, the PT will teach you to use medical exercise equipment and approved exercises to regain your lost flexibility and improve your mobility where possible. You may use treadmills, steps, medicine balls, resistance bands, isometric exercises, weights and more. From young children to seniors, patients of any age can benefit from the science-based movements and exercises that encourage flexibility, rebuild muscle, and ease stiff joints.

What are the different types of physical therapy?

Physical therapists work with people who have been injured or people who are ill to improve their movement and help them manage their pain. The U.S. Department of Labor explains that physical therapists “are often an important part of rehabilitation, treatment, and prevention of patients with chronic conditions, illnesses, or injuries.” Physical therapists can also choose to specialize in one of nine areas. According to the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties, these areas of specialization are:

  • Cardiovascular and Pulmonary
  • Clinical Electrophysiology
  • Geriatrics
  • Neurology
  • Oncology
  • Orthopaedics
  • Pediatrics
  • Sports and
  • Women's Health

 

The national average cost for a physical therapist is $60 to $80, although it will cost more if the patient is paying for services out of pocket rather than through insurance. If you have insurance and want to work with a physical therapist for a specialty area, such as oncology or geriatrics, you may need a referral from your general practitioner. Patients who are paying directly for services can often contact the physical therapist directly.

What exactly does a physical therapist do?

A physical therapist is a health care provider who assists patients with mobility improvement and pain management. Often patients are referred to a physical therapist by a primary care doctor or specialist for help recovering from a surgery or traumatic injury, such as a car crash. Physical therapists help patients manage pain that results from chronic disease and other illness. Physical therapy can help enhance mobility when patients are faced with neurological disorders, such as after a stroke, and provide relief from arthritis or other mobility and pain issues.   

A physical therapist uses medical exercise equipment and exercises to empower patients to regain flexibility and mobility where possible. They may use treadmills, steps, medicine balls, resistance bands, isometric exercises, weights and more to improve muscle control and movement. A physical therapist uses physical movement to help heal the patient, but also can sometimes prescribe medication as appropriate. A physical therapist can also become board certified in one of nine specialty areas.

Is kickboxing hard?

Kickboxing is as intense a workout as you want it to be. As with any fitness regimen, the more effort you put in, the more results you will get. The type of kickboxing you do will determine how physically challenging it is. Combat or self-defense kickboxing, where you train in a martial arts studio with sandbags or spar against combat partners, can be an intense physical workout. Group kickboxing classes that use sandbags as part of the workout will also elevate the degree of intensity, because of the level of exertion punching and kicking the bag requires. Cardio kickboxing group fitness, which employ kicking and punching moves but no sandbags, has comparable intensity to jogging but works a wider range of muscles while increasing strength, flexibility and coordination. Here are some of the core kickboxing moves:

  • Cross: A straight punch that you throw slightly across your body, using your dominant hand.
  • Jab: A quick, straight, face punch. Usually thrown with the non-dominant hand.
  • Uppercut: A punch thrown up from the midsection (using either hand) that connects with the underside of your opponent’s chin.
  • Hook: A curved punch (using either hand) that connects with your competitor’s jaw or chin.
  • Side kick: A kick delivered when your competitor is at an angle to you. Raise your leg to the side, then bend at the knee to deliver the kick.
  • Front kick: A kick delivered straight on while you are facing your opponent.
  • Roundhouse kick: A kick delivered by swinging a leg up in a clockwise or counterclockwise motion (depending on which leg you’re using) with momentum to strike the opponent with the instep of the foot.

What is kickboxing?

Kickboxing is a type of martial art whose basic moves are widely practiced in personal and group fitness regimens. In combat kickboxing, two competitors fight using four points of contact — both hands and both feet — unlike traditional boxing, where competitors are allowed to use their hands. In competitive kickboxing, opponents must remain standing, and no fighting can occur on the mat or ground. Kickboxing has its roots in Muay Thai and other ancient martial arts. Some elemental moves from kickboxing include roundhouse kicks, back kicks, hooks, uppercuts and more.

Modern group fitness kickboxing is practiced in gyms and workout studios across the country. It draws its moves from combat kickboxing, but instead of fighting with an opponent, participants perform jabs, crosses, punches and kicks in instructor-led, choreographed routines set to music. Personal trainers also incorporate kickboxing moves into workout routines, spending time punching and kicking the bag. These strength-building moves, mixed with high-intensity intervals, boost heart rate and increase strength.

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