Pittsburgh, PA14 Cabinet Refinishers near you

Where do you need the cabinet refinisher?

Answer a few questions

Tell us what you need so we can bring you the right pros.

Get quotes

Receive quotes from pros who meet your needs.

Hire the right pro

Compare quotes, message pros, and hire when ready.

Pittsburgh Cabinet Refinishers

Browse these cabinet refinishers with great ratings from Thumbtack customers in Pittsburgh.

Maxwell Remodeling
4.7
from 74 reviews
  • 36 years in business
  • 96 hires on Thumbtack
Bradley P.
Verified review

We hired Frank to paint the exterior of our brick home, add shutters and refinish the existing wood front door. Frank and his team were honest, hard working, very detailed and made our house the best looking on the street! I will definitely use him again for future projects.

  • 59 years in business
  • 37 hires on Thumbtack
Liz H.
Verified review

They were absolutely fantastic in every way! Caring, careful, efficient, and are able to do repairs and refinishing as well as custom work so two thumbs up! Excellent!

Lasser Custom Woodworking
4.7
from 9 reviews
  • 38 years in business
  • 6 hires on Thumbtack
Teresa F.
Verified review

Gus was able to replicate a corner cabinet for me. He was very responsive, timely and kept me in the loop throughout the process. The cabinet turned out just as I had hoped. I am pleased with the quality product and service.

Elm Construction Services
4.7
from 9 reviews
  • 4 years in business
  • 8 hires on Thumbtack
Nora W.
Verified review

he did an excellent job at refinishing my deck. he power washed it then stained it.it looks like a brand new deck.very please with his work.

Gibson Remodeling
4.9
from 7 reviews
  • 17 years in business
  • 8 hires on Thumbtack
Kevin L.
Verified review

Responded quickly, did an excellent job trimming my cabinet so my new refrigerator would fit in the space.

Fix All Home Repairs
4.6
from 7 reviews
  • 18 years in business
  • 8 hires on Thumbtack
Tareesa B.
Verified review

He renovated my kitchen. Removed old kitchen and in cabinets, plus did plumbing and electrical work. Replaced existing door with a 72" slifing door. Plus removed a wall.

  • 23 years in business
Bill H.
Verified review

Matt made all new doors and drawers for a section of aging kitchen cabinets in need of repair and we have been very pleased with his work. The price was right too!

About

I am a cabinet maker and installer. I remove old cabinets and disconnect water supply lines to put in savings. I'm not a plumber, but I have some little knowledge, and I'm no-no means electrician.

About

I have refinished lots of furniture, mostly antiques. I can refinish any kind of wood product but I think it's only best for people who have a personal attachment for refinishing otherwise it might be too costly.

About

Splash Pittsburgh specializes in quality bar, bathroom and kitchen plumbing fixtures, sinks, faucets, custom countertops, tile, and cabinets from Kohler and Moen.

About

Let me make that great wood floor beautiful again. I will come to your home, seal off the area to be work in, remove the offending previous mess of a paint job/stain/vinyl floor/bad taste that the previous owner left on your hardwood floor, bag it up in hefty garbage bags, and remove it. That's step one. Then for step two, I will complete the removal of the said nastiness from your soon-to-be-lovely floors using the tools at my disposal. Note: I do not use bad chemicals on your floors or in your home. I never use them in mine; why would I use them in yours? If I use paint removal compounds, they are strictly "green" and government approved to be so. Next, my favorite part - sanding. This is where my sealing off the work area really pays off for your home. It is also where I don the ventilator mask and eye safety protection mask that my kids tell me makes me look like a bug. But sanding is the first real step, to me, to seeing the character and warmth in your floors that new floors and laminates just can't hope to duplicate. Ahh, I love my work. The wood gets four coats of sandings - coarse, medium, fine, and steel lamb's wool - before I even think about staining. After I stain, the floor gets another rubdown with steel lamb's wool, just to make it silky to the touch, and if it needs a touch-up with the stain, it gets one. Next stop, staining. Lots of people with pine floors don't want to stain, which leads the wood to get a nice, warm, reddish glow over the years. It does, however, make the floor harder to keep clean [natch] over the years. My floors are pine (my house is over a hundred years old), and my husband preferred an oak stain. I scratched my head, but I went for it. I have to admit that it looks great. So, score one for the husband. There's a lot of debate currently on whether or not to seal wood floors. I will do this if you want me to, but personally, I'm against it. Floors that are sealed up are, I've found to my sorrow, floors that dry up and can crack. You are much better off not sealing the floor, but brooming the dust off of it weekly, or swiffling it weekly. Once a year, rub it down with (brace yourselves) olive oil. Yep, good old-fashioned olive oil, with maybe some lemon oil mixed in for fragrance, will do your wood good. Forget the expensive, fancy-schmancy stuff you can buy online. Olive oil - that's the ticket. I go for the natural treatments of wood, and of other things, as much as possible, not only because it's the best for the living things in the household, but because it works best. I don't give price estimates online, because I like to see what I'm working with first. What I do is refinish a free twenty-by-twenty-inch area of your floor for free. Gratis. Nada. You pay nothing. Ever. I like to see what I'm buying, and I like to treat the customer like I'd want to be treated. That is my way to giving an estimate. If you like what I do, I'll finish the floor. If you don't, we part friends. I hope to hear from you soon. Let's get that floor of yours looking good and feeling great under your bare toes. Suze

About

Haven Hardwoods, Inc. installs and refinishes all species of hardwood flooring. We install all types of custom trim and thresholds. We also offer other constructions services such as decks, bathroom remodels and basement renovations.

About

We have a cabinet shop, and we cater to residential and commercial clients. Food service is also available. We do it all, from kitchens, baths, and custom furniture to food service for universities and colleges. Customers love our attention to detail and honesty.

  • 11 years in business
About

well I guess that shows how much I love woodworking but I enjoyed myself when I'm making whatever I make

Q & A

Answers to commonly asked questions from the experts on Thumbtack.

How do you refinish kitchen cabinets?

If you’re ready for a new look and feel in your kitchen but don’t want to replace the cabinet layout or your cabinet doors, refinishing your existing kitchen cabinets is a great option. To be a good candidate for cabinet refinishing, your cabinet boxes and doors need to be in good condition. Cabinet refinishing includes taking down your doors, sanding or stripping the surface, preparing the doors with primer as needed, refinishing them with as many coats of stain or paint are necessary, then re-hanging them in their original locations. If you’re not in love with your kitchen cabinet layout, talk to a designer or contractor about creating an alternative. Refinishing simply means adding new shine to the existing setup, so if you’re dying to have a pull-out pantry or maximize wall space by going flush to the ceiling, you may want a different approach. Functional and stylish ready-to-assemble (RTA) cabinets can be similar in cost to refacing your existing cabinets, so keep the budget-friendly RTA option in mind when making decisions.

How do you resurface cabinets?

Resurfacing kitchen cabinets means that you retain your original cabinet boxes and existing cabinet layout and simply remove and replace the front layer of your cabinet doors. Cabinet resurfacing can also entail replacing damaged cabinet doors, keeping those that are in good shape, and installing a new surface on all of them. Cabinet resurfacing may also refer to a decision to completely change out cabinet doors because they are damaged or their style is out of date, but keeping the existing cabinet boxes and layout.

If you’re handy and have all the proper tools, cabinet resurfacing can be a DIY project, especially if you’re simply repainting. However, if you’re not comfortable removing and replacing your cabinet doors, doing precision measurements and cutting, or working with sanders and power tools, then this may be a project better left to the pros. You or your handyman or cabinet installation specialist will remove all cabinet door and drawer fronts and all hardware, then prepare the surfaces for a new layer. The pros should also update the veneer or laminate the frames to match. Once the new laminate, veneer or surface has been applied and new hardware installed, your cabinet doors and drawers are hung once more in their original locations. The national average cost for refacing cabinets is $5,000.

Can you resurface laminate cabinets?

Resurfacing laminate cabinets is an affordable and relatively easy way to give an outdated kitchen a fresh new look. If your existing cabinets are in good shape and you like your current cabinet layout, putting a fresh face on your kitchen could mean simply painting over the current laminate or putting a new laminate surface on the doors and drawers. Cabinet resurfacing may be possible for the capable DIY homeowner, but if you don’t have the proper tools or the know-how, it’s wise to call a handyman or a cabinet installation specialist to ensure you have a professional-looking outcome. To make sure your kitchen is right for cabinet resurfacing (as opposed to completely replacing your cabinets), ask yourself:

  • Do I like the layout of my current cabinets?
  • Are the cabinet boxes structurally sound?
  • Are the floor and framing in good condition to keep cabinets supported over time?
  • Are the cabinets free of water or wood damage?

How much does it cost to refinish kitchen cabinets?

Cabinet refinishing revives dull or dinged-up doors and drawers. The cost of cabinet refinishing will vary based on factors such as the number of linear feet of cabinetry you have, the amount of nicks and scratches that need repair, the level of detail on your cabinets, and more. The pros typically will remove the cabinet doors and then sand or strip them down to create a beautifully smooth new surface. After prepping the surface with primer as needed, the pros may then repaint or stain the doors to give them a new lease on life. Cabinets with intricate detail or extensive surface damage will likely cost more to refinish, as they will take more time and effort. Keep in mind that you should only elect to do cabinet refinishing if the cabinet boxes are structurally sound and you plan to keep your current kitchen layout for a number of years. The investment will be wasted if the cabinet boxes are in disrepair and will need replacement soon, or if you’re planning a remodel in two years. The national average price range for cabinet refinishing is between $1,500 and $6,000.

Hire skilled professionals for absolutely everything.