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Tallahassee Scrap Metal Services

Browse these scrap metal services with great ratings from Thumbtack customers in Tallahassee.

  • 3 hires on Thumbtack
Cheryl H.
Verified review

Scott and Kashad are amazing! Together, they can provide improvement services that are second to none. If you are looking for a carpenter/contractor who knows his stuff and stands behind his work, that would be Scott. If you are looking for a great assistant, who is polite, helpful, learning quickly and strong, that would be Kashad. In our opinion, our project was overwhelming to say the least - our 20 year old vintage wood-paneled garage door was rotting from both the weather and a really bad paint job (please see first 3 photos below). The wood was rotting to a point that hinges were about to fall off and we thought the garage door would eventually fail. We were quoted a high price by several garage door companies to replace our vintage wood garage door with a "run of the mill", metal garage door. Hoping we could find someone with exceptional carpentry and painting skills, good math and measurement skills, we went on Thumbtack and found Scott's Home Improvements. Thank goodness we did because Scott had to rebuild the entire bottom horizontal row of wood panels on our wood garage door to repair the old wood garage door. To accomplish this tedious task, Scott meticulously examined the existing wood. He required 1/2 $ down for materials and soon found the closest match he could to the existing wood. Please let me tell you, Scott knows wood. Soon thereafter, the bottom panels were removed by Scott and Kashad with care and the hardware was kept close at hand. Scott was smart to disengage the garage door mechanism so we would not lower the remaining rows of the garage door by accident - sending them crashing to the floor below. In addition, Scott hung a tarp to keep our belongings safe and sound while the work took place. Most of the work was performed outside of the garage in our driveway - even in the coldest of temperatures to get the job done. Once the work began, Scott assembled the 20' bottom frame, by installing some and rebuilding most of the beveled wood panels and battens so they could finally connect each panel and wood batten inside the frame with perfection. Scott managed to replace the bottom row of panels on our garage door so well, that the garage door never looked so good! Amazingly to us, no one would ever know that the bottom 3 foot high by 20 foot wide row of panels/battens were replaced. Because Scott picked the right wood, once he stained the wood, it matched the other remaining rows above it exactly (inside and out). I think matching the stain was an art as well. To top the job off, Scott coated the exterior stain with a good polyurethane to protect the wood door from both the sun and weather. Wow, what a job well done. Thank you Scott and Kashad!

About

We are on time we are there when you call

About

Dice Industrial Services, LLC provides the following services: * metal fabrication/installation * welding * pipe fabrication/installation * equipment relocation/installation * support fabrication/installation * platform fabrication/installation * stainless or carbon steel work

  • 18 years in business
About

We do all of the following: * Site cleaning * Site prep * Metal buildings * Concrete work * Housecleaning * Debris removal * Carpentry jobs * Steel work

Q & A

Answers to commonly asked questions from the experts on Thumbtack.

How does a welder work?

A welder is person who works (typically) with metal. Welding can be done with a wide variety of metals including aluminum, wrought iron, stainless steel, carbon steel and galvanized steel. A welder uses extreme heat to meld together metal pieces to repair or create metal structures. Welding is used for automotive, structural, plate, decorative, pipe, restoration and other metalwork projects. Some items that are made by welding are custom fences, metal gates, interior decorative metalwork, and safety features such as window bars or safety gates for children or pets. The average national cost for welding services ranges from $100 to $150, although pricing can be higher depending on project scale and whether the cost of the metal is included. Hourly rates for welding services can range from $65 to $125. Welders may have a minimum service fee, especially if they are performing the work at your location. Welding can be dangerous work without the proper safety equipment, so welders work with protective masks and body coverings to prevent damage to their vision or skin. Some examples of welding repairs could be $25-$30 for tacking together small items (such as patio chairs), or $35-$100 for larger repairs on metal furniture. Bigger projects, such as a baby gate to seal off the top of a staircase, could cost $550-$750. This price would include one full day of metal cutting, one full day of welding and construction, one to one and a half full days of grinding and painting, and a few hours of installation.

How long is welding training?

Because there are different paths to learning to weld, there’s no single timeline for welding training. Some people attend school part-time while working their current job, while others can focus full-time on their welding training courses. People interested in learning how to weld as a hobby can also take classes from professional welders, such as at KCMA & Services in Waterloo, Indiana.

Expect to take at least two years to go from welding newbie to American Welding Society Certified Welder. A junior college Certificate of Completion welding course is two semesters full-time, or 10 units of coursework. With this certificate, students are qualified for an apprenticeship or internship, rather than a full-time entry-level job. Welding apprenticeships range from 6,000 to 8,000 hours long, equalling three to four years at 2,000 hours per year. Some junior colleges, such as Cerritos College in the Los Angeles area, offer more in-depth welding programs that lead to different welding certifications, such as arc welding and tungsten gas arc welding. These take three to four semesters to complete, so you could be qualified for an entry-level job in about two years of full-time study. Alternatively, you can prepare for employment more quickly through an intensive vocational program at a trade school. For instance, Ohio’s Lincoln Electric Company offers a comprehensive program that prepares people for a welding career in just 20 weeks and 600 hours of hands-on instruction.

How many types of welding are there?

Welding is a method of fusing together two or more pieces of metal using electricity or flame. Welding is used to construct buildings, make metal sculptures, build and repair cars, make gates and furniture, and for many other practical and aesthetic uses. There are multiple types of welding. Here is an overview of the most popular methods:

  • Stick welding: Formally known as shielded metal arc welding, stick welding uses extreme heat applied at the seam of two separate metals to melt them together. A third (intermediary) metal may also be incorporated for added strength. As the metals cool, they are bonded together.
  • Metal inert gas (MIG) welding: Formally known as gas metal arc welding, MIG welding uses a tool to feed metal wire into the weld puddle while an electrical arc melts the wire, which will fuse to the base metal upon cooling.
  • Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding: Formally referred to gas tungsten arc welding, TIG welding is a similar process MIG welding, but instead of using a tool that continuously feeds metal wire into the weld puddle, the welder must hold and manually feed the stick.
  • Gas welding: A mix of flammable gas and oxygen is used to heat metal to the melting point.
  • Forge welding: Forging metal is an ancient art that involves heating two pieces of metal until they are molten, then hammering them together.

Where can I take welding classes?

Your options for welding classes depend on where you live and whether you’re willing to travel. Many skilled professionals offer private or group welding classes across the U.S. Some high schools offer classes for teens, but many people learn from a private trainer or in a junior college or vocational school. Students learn basic welding, machining and fabrication processes, including using gas and arc welding equipment, and qualify for an apprenticeship or internship. Other colleges as well as vocational schools have two-year associate’s degree programs that prepare you to take the welding certification exam and seek full-time employment.

How much is welding training?

The cost of welding training depends on where you take your classes and how quickly you want to complete the program. In general, junior college welding classes are the least expensive, but may take longer; trade schools offer intensive classes that lead to certification more quickly, but are more expensive. For example, Cerritos College, a junior college in Los Angeles that offers a welding training course, charges an average of $46 per unit; most of their welding certificate programs require 19 units of coursework, so cost about $875 each to complete. Pro-Weld, an on-site welding school in Idaho, offers three different welding courses. The 36-week welder fabrication and the 24-week gas tungsten arc welding courses each cost an average of $3,300, while pipe welding costs an average of $2,500 for a 24-week session or an average of $4,500 for a 52-week session. The 20-week comprehensive program at the Lincoln Electric Company in Ohio costs an average of $9,500. Many programs require students to purchase approximately $120-$200 worth of personal welding equipment in addition to textbooks or other class material fees.

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