A note to our community regarding COVID-19. Learn more
Find a Drafting Professional near Cambridge, MA

Find a Drafting Professional near Cambridge, MA

4 near you

Find a Drafting Professional near Cambridge, MA

4 near you

Give us a few details and we’ll match you with the right pro.

Zip code

Top 4 Drafting Professionals near Cambridge, MA

Avatar for d.a.kinsella company, Inc.
Avatar for d.a.kinsella company, Inc.
4. d.a.kinsella company, Inc.
4.3

(4)

4.3

(4)

  • 6 hires on Thumbtack
  • Serves Cambridge, MA
Our house was a 1955 ranch-style house with 3 bedrooms, one bath, kitchen, and living/dining room that we moved into in 1995. We had been looking to add a second bathroom and had originally worked with an architect from NH to do a modest front and rear bump out to give us more room to fit in a second bathroom. This architect had to withdraw from the job and recommended David Kinsella of TBC. David initially made some modest changes to the plan that made sense. After some further discussion, in which my wife and I raised the possibility of a larger scale project to modernize the style of the house, David developed a plan that essentially rebuilt the house except for our previously remodeled kitchen and original foundation. This new plan converted our house into modern design with a more open floor plan, completely new roof line, loft space, re-finished basement (and the second bathroom). David was able to fit this into an only slightly expanded footprint in order to comply with town regulations. Throughout the process, David kept our budget in mind and would typically present different price options for us to choose from to allow us to come up with a reasonable comprise between price with style. In addition TBC worked with the town to make sure our design stayed within our zoning and conservation restrictions. After deciding to go ahead with the project, we interviewed several contractors and decided that TBC brought us the best value for our money and would also allow David to oversee the project as needed. We started the project in June 2011 and completed the project in May 2012. The project did take several months longer than expected, but did stay on budget. The major problem that occurred that delayed the project was that in the summer of 2011, the original subcontracted framers were being sent to other jobs by their boss even though TBC was told they would be coming to our job. Hence, instead of working full time on our job, they were working less than half time. Eventually TBC had to fire them and find a new contractor to step in. At the time we felt that TBC should have replaced them sooner, but perhaps this was difficult due to contractual obligations. (We also found this first group of framers were slobs who did not have much regard for the fact that we were still living in the house.) By the end of summer 2011, the house was not completely framed and roofed and number of rain storms (including hurricane Irene) slowed down progress further. In mid-October we were still living in the part of the house and we agreed at this point that we would move out to allow for a more efficient work flow. From this point construction generally proceeded ahead, except for a few delays do to weather and scheduling conflicts that arose for other subcontractors, no doubt due to the significant delay caused by the no-show framers. In the end the house is beautiful and works for us better than we could have imagined. While the house has not expanded much in terms of square feet, the open floor plan and high ceiling/roof line combined with increased natural lighting gives a much more expansive feeling inside. From the curb, the house has modern angular green metal roof with cedar siding and one has to look hard to find any resemblance to the original house. At the completion of of the project, TBC was very responsive to completing punch-list items and other minor issues that arose. While my wife and I certainly had stressful times during the renovation (and certainly did a lot of second guessing our decision to renovate rather than move), we always felt that David had a personal interest in getting the job done correctly and making sure that we were happy in the end. In that regard, David was very accessible by email or phone before, during, and after the work. In summary, David Kinsella provided the creativity to design a renovation plan that was truly transforming for our house and TBC was then able to see the plan through to successful completion.See more

Q & A

Answers to commonly asked questions from the experts on Thumbtack.

How do architects work?

Architects may work for an architecture or engineering firm, they may work for a government organization, they can work for a construction company, or they may be self-employed (freelance). The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics explains that architects spend a large amount of their working time in the home or company office: meeting with clients; creating reports and architectural drawings; and working with other architects and engineers. When not in an office, an architect is often at the construction site either as part of the development of plans or to ensure building progress is following the blueprint.

When a client interacts with an architect, it is typically to have them design drawings for the construction of a house or a building. If you are a client who has hired a large architecture firm, there may be a team of people working on your design. But if you are working with a freelance architect or a smaller firm, one person (or a small group) will take your concept and translate it into an architectural blueprint that a builder can use to construct a house. The plans will lay out everything from the depth of the foundation to the materials to use to the type of metal to be used in the reinforcement. Once the plans have been created and handed off to the builder, the architect may remain on the project — depending on budget — and oversee progress.

How do architects charge for their services?

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the median salary of an architect in 2016 was $76,930. This range included architects with every type of company as well as self-employed architects. Depending on the architect and whether they’re with a firm or independent, they may charge per hour or by the square foot, or they may charge a percentage of the total budget for a construction project. An hourly rate is typically used for smaller projects such as providing consultation, helping clients hone their concept before the design process begins, or drafting documents and plans. If an architect is working on an hourly basis on a larger project, there will usually be an agreed-upon cap on the number of hours they will work. For larger projects, such as new construction or total overhaul remodels, architects may charge a percentage of the total construction costs. The architect will usually set the percentage you will pay after the total cost of construction has been accounted for. Percentages can range within a firm depending on the extent of the services they’re providing. For example, a lower percentage of the total construction costs may include drafting and minimal consultation and guidance along the way, while a higher percentage could include on-site project management services with every detail attended to. Architects may also charge by the square footage of the project. The rate per square foot can vary depending on the individual’s training, the services they are providing, the complexity of the project, and other factors — such as obtaining permits. The national average cost to hire an architect is between $1,690 and $2,500.

Why hire professionals on Thumbtack?
Free to use

You never pay to use Thumbtack: Get cost estimates, contact pros, and even book the job—all for no cost.

Compare prices side-by-side

You’ll know how much your project costs even before booking a pro.

Hire with confidence

With access to 1M+ customer reviews and the pros’ work history, you’ll have all the info you need to make a hire.