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Ashburn, VA 20149

Sink and Faucet Installers on Thumbtack cost$140 - $180

Average price

3 Sink and Faucet Installers found near you!

  • Lowest price:$70
  • Most common low price:$140
  • Most common high price:$180
  • Highest price:$350

How much does sink installation cost?

On average nationwide, sink installation costs $206. That does not include the price of the new sink. For the new sink and installation, expect to pay around $400 total. How much you'll pay will depend the style of sink and whether or not you already have plumbing in place.

A new kitchen sink can change the whole look and functionality of your room. Add a three-foot wide, ceramic farmhouse sink to your kitchen and it goes from ho-hum to Pinterest-worthy. However, getting that look isn't as simple as clicking a "buy-now" button. You also need someone to install it.

Fortunately, full-service plumbing companies sell and install sinks, though you can also buy one from a home improvement or kitchen and bath supply store, then hire a local plumber to install it. Before you hire a sink installer to upgrade your bathroom or kitchen sink, get an estimate on how much it will cost with this guide.

What's in this cost guide?

What affects the cost of sink installation?

How much you pay to install a bathroom or kitchen sink depends on the type, material, faucets, and whether or not it's a replacement or a new installation. Adding a garbage disposal to a kitchen sink will also raise costs.

Type of sink

The style you choose will affect the look and function of your room and the sink installation cost, because some styles are more complex to put in than others.

Below are the average costs for sink installation by type:

Type of sink Average installation cost
Drop-in $150
Vessel $200
Pedestal $210
Undermount $230
Farmhouse or apron $240

 

Drop-in sinks

Drop in sinks, as the name says, are dropped into a hole cut in the countertop, with a rim that runs around its edges. These are super easy to install.

Vessel

Vessel sinks look like bowls that sit atop a cabinet and are popular in high-end bathrooms. They may be made of glass, copper, ceramic, or stone and are fairly easy to install.

Pedestal sinks

Pedestal sinks stand on their own, without a countertop, atop a pedestal. They were popular in the early 20th century and they've made a comeback in recent years. Though it looks like the pedestal supports the sink, the wall behind it actually holds the sink's weight.

Undermount sinks

Undermounts are mounted below a countertop, so they appear to hang beneath the counter. Undermounts are heavy and need to be installed in a stone or concrete counter on a sturdy cabinet base—no laminate counters or MDF cabinets for this style. Installing undermounts is tricky, because the contractor will need to properly seal the edges to prevent leaks and make sure water drains properly.

Farmhouse or apron

These are all the rage right now for kitchen sinks, thanks to the contemporary farmhouse look popularized by Chip and Joanna Gaines. They have a vintage look, with a wide front panel that drops over the edge of the countertop. They're big and heavy, so they need specialized base cabinets and require an extensive installation job.

Sink material

The material you pick generally won't affect installation costs (unless you choose a heavy material like ceramic, copper, or cast iron) but it will impact your total remodel cost. Opt for a double basin copper sink with high-end faucets, and you can add thousands to the total cost of putting in that upgraded kitchen sink.

Below are the average prices of different sinks based on their material:

Material Description Average price
Solid surface Made of sheets of polyester and acrylic resins, they're often fabricated of the same material as the counter and molded into one solid piece for an integral look. Common in bathrooms. $70 to $1,000
Stainless steel Simple, versatile, and affordable, stainless steel is the go-to for kitchen sinks because it's easy to clean, durable, and matches all those stainless steel appliances. Go with 18- to 20-gauge steel to get maximum durability and strength. $100 to $800
Composite These are a manmade mix of quartz dust and resin molded into sink form that's durable, chip-resistant, stain-proof, and more affordable than solid stone. $149 to $600
Cast iron An old-time favorite that have made a recent comeback, cast iron sinks are made of iron. They're heavy and hard to install because they need a counter and base cabinet that can support their bulk. $190 to $2,400
Granite and other solid stone Gorgeous yet expensive, granite and other solid stones are durable. However, lighter colored stone like marble can stain. $250 to $800
Fireclay Fireclay is a type of ceramic commonly used in a lot of farmhouse or other retro style sinks. It's scratch- and stain-resistant, but can be chipped. Ceramic/fireclay is very heavy and needs a counter and cabinet base that can support it. $350 to $1,000
Copper Super-luxe and super pricey, copper brings high-end texture and color to your kitchen sink. They're durable, naturally antibiotic, and stain-resistant but also heavy, weighing as much as 50 pounds, and more difficult to install. $395 to $3,250

Adding a garbage disposal to kitchen sinks

If you add a garbage disposal to your kitchen sink, expect to pay $150 to $225 for the unit and $70 to $325 for installation, ringing up a total average cost of $255, nationwide.

Faucets

New bathroom or kitchen faucets will cost $115 on average nationwide for installation. The cost of faucets depends on the type you pick, with prices ranging from $100 for a basic, stainless steel, single-handle kitchen faucet to $1,200 for a high-end, two-handle bridge faucet with sprayer and a high, swan-necked arch.

If you're updating your faucets along with the sink, you'll need to pay the plumber to swap them out as well as buy new faucets.

Replacement vs. new sink installation

New sink installation in a place where there wasn't one before, like in a new home, a room addition, or as part of a major bathroom or kitchen remodel, is more complicated and expensive, since new plumbing has to be set up. Expect to pay $1,000-$3,500 for the plumber to install pipes and tie them to the existing water lines.

A simple replacement will be more affordable, since all of the necessary plumbing is already in place. To cut down on costs, keep the new sink in the same spot as the old one.

Bathroom vs. kitchen sinks

Kitchen sinks usually cost more to install than bathroom sinks because they're bigger and need to be connected to more plumbing fixtures, like garbage disposals or spray nozzles.

Whether you change styles

Installing a different type of sink than your old one will increase the labor costs. Let's say you replace a single basin, stainless steel, drop-in sink with a double-basin farmhouse. You'll need to redo the counter and cabinets around the sink to make it fit. This drives up labor costs, and may require the work of a remodeling company or general contractor as well as a plumber.

Labor costs

Depending on what your remodel and new sink installation involves, you will also have to consider some or all of the following labor costs:

  • Plumbing. Some plumbers will charge a flat rate for sink installation, while others will charge by the hour. Expect to pay $130-$400 on average nationwide to replace a sink with a similar model in a location where supply and drain lines are in place.
  • Cabinets. If you need to change your cabinet base to accommodate your new sink, expect to pay $100-$600 per linear foot for new cabinets.
  • Sink removal. For replacements, you'll need to pay to remove the old sink and haul it off. Some plumbers will charge extra for the demo and disposal, while others include it in the cost of the installation. Expect to pay $20-$70 to remove the old sink and $25-$35 to have it hauled away.

How can you find someone to install a new sink?

To make sure you hire the right person to install your new bathroom or kitchen sink, be sure to:

  • Hire a plumber. Get a licensed, local plumber, not a handyman, to put in a sink. Get the caulking or pipe hookup wrong, and you could end up with leaks that cause expensive water damage to cabinets, counters, and walls, or a kitchen sink that won't drain properly. If you're getting a very different replacement, you may need to hire a kitchen or bath remodeling company or general contractor who can make changes to cabinets, counters, or flooring.
  • Look at past projects and reviews. Make sure the plumber has experience installing the type of sink you're getting. You don't want an amateur knocking a dent in your $2,000 copper sink when he installs it. You can also find reviews on Thumbtack to see what experience other homeowners had with the contractor.
  • Get free estimates from multiple plumbers and ask what's included. Will you pay extra for to remove and haul away the old sink? Is there a warranty on the installation? All of these questions are important to answer upfront.

Whether you're upgrading an old kitchen sink that won't drain properly, or adding a second one to your bathroom as part of a remodel, a professional plumber can help make your home improvements easy. Find a local plumber or sink installer in your zip code on Thumbtack.

How do we know these prices?

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